Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Is anyone asking what is the cost of not having rail service?

Public transport is always having a "funding crisis." That is because costs and benefits are manipulated. We should consider all the costs. What is the cost of thousands of additional cars on the highways, streets, and parking lots?

Stakes raised for possible government takeover of Taiwan High Speed Rail - The China Post: "THSRC could face bankruptcy in March or April because it doesn't have the cash needed to meet potential preferred share redemption obligations."

Sunday, February 1, 2015

Money spent to move cars faster is a bad policy

Here is an example of money wasted supporting the car culture. Pedestrian overpasses are expensive and rarely used. Their purpose is not to protect pedestrians, but to allow traffic to move faster. Faster traffic actually puts pedestrians at more risk. Instead we should invest the money in free buses and gradually get rid of private autos. Private autos take up too much room, are inefficient in moving people and are dangerous.

Friday, January 30, 2015

Taiwan public transportation budget raised to new high

WantChinaTimes: "The ministry anticipates that it will not be easy to achieve a government goal of a 30% public transportation market share by 2025, Lin said.

The ministry hopes that local governments, particularly those of the six special municipalities–Taipei, New Taipei, Taoyuan, Taichung, Tainan and Kaohsiung–can do more to encourage people to use public transport, he said.

The 2015 budget will be spent on the subsidization of public bus operations in remote areas and measures to replace old buses and taxis with new ones and promote a multipurpose ticket card system for public bus and railway services, according to the ministry."

Monday, January 26, 2015

Hong Kong cars take up too much space, move too few people

South China Morning Post: "The increasing use of private cars inevitably uses up limited road resources. According to the traffic congestion report, private cars account for 40 to 70 per cent of the total traffic on most of the main roads, but carry only 16 per cent of the total daily number of road-based travellers, or "passenger boardings".

Minibuses and buses, by contrast, carry 71 per cent of total daily road-based passenger boardings, but account for only 5 to 25 per cent of total traffic on major roads."


Thursday, January 1, 2015

In Taiwan, cars are still winning the war for government subsidy

Taipei Times: "The Ministry of Transportation and Communications yesterday said that local governments should make public transport development the top priority in their transportation policies, adding that it could ask local governments to refund subsidies granted to them if a transport facility is underused or demolished because of inadequate evaluation in its planning."

Friday, December 19, 2014

Cars not selling well in Japan

Car Lobby Admits "Sense Of Panic" | Zero Hedge: "
The head of Japan's auto lobby on Thursday said a "sense of crisis" hung over the industry, with unexpectedly weak domestic sales revealing the failure of government stimulus policies and currency turmoil hitting key export markets.
 
Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA) Chairman Fumihiko Ike said an April sales tax hike was only partly to blame for the domestic sales weakness, citing the government's failure to boost consumption.
 
"We are seeing continued weakness in domestic new car sales that go beyond a backlash to the April sales tax hike," he said, adding that new car sales were down by double digits after the tax hike.
 
Both Toyota and Honda cut their domestic vehicle sales targets when they announced their second-quarter results in November and October respectively."

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

City real estate too high, gasoline too cheap. Result: sprawl

First-time home buyers flee Greater Taipei - The China Post: "Statistics showed that a total of 7,811 people moved to Keelung — about a 20-25 minute freeway drive to Taipei — in the first nine months of this year, with 71 percent of them coming from either Taipei or New Taipei, the ring that surrounds the capital."